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4 entries.
Don Rosenski Don Rosenski from Gary wrote on May 25, 2018 at 2:42 am:
Godspeed brother, condolences and prayers for all may the Great Architect of the Universe welcome you with open arms and look over your family and friends. SMIB... /G\
Sarah Sarah from South Dakota wrote on May 22, 2018 at 5:06 pm:
Hey my great uncle, he was very nice and loved great uncle. He put a smile on ever one faces he has good heart he will be miss by the Garrison. I will miss you Uncle Art
Nancy Osika Nancy Osika from Hobart wrote on May 22, 2018 at 4:24 pm:
Heartfelt condolences and prayers.
Ronald Garrison Ronald Garrison from Valparaiso wrote on May 22, 2018 at 9:00 am:
I have had two heroes in my life and they were brothers Joe went a few years ago and now Dad. Now I could stand here and tell you my father was a patient man but I would be afraid of the Lightning Bolt. Dad had a fuse about this long LOL. It never failed when we would be working on something it would all go terribly wrong but no matter how many four and five letters words it took, we would always get the job done.

My father taught me at a very young age the importance of doing a job right the first time, he always said be a jack of all trades but a master of none. He believed in going the extra mile and making sure things were done to the best of your ability. I have often thought, if I can be just half the man my father was then I have something to be proud of.

In closing I want to leave you with a short poem often read at Masonic Services, the very first time I heard it I thought of my father.

THE DASH
I read of a man who stood to speak
at the funeral of a friend.
He referred to the dates on the tombstone
from the beginning…to the end.

He noted that first came the date of birth
and spoke the following date with tears,
but he said what mattered most of all
was the dash between those years.

For that dash represents all the time
that they spent alive on earth.
And now only those who loved them
know what that little line is worth.

For it matters not, how much we own,
the cars…the house…the cash.
What matters is how we live and love
and how we spend our dash.

So, think about this long and hard.
Are there things you’d like to change?
For you never know how much time is left
that can still be rearranged.

If we could just slow down enough
to consider what’s true and real
and always try to understand
the way other people feel.

And be less quick to anger
and show appreciation more
and love the people in our lives
like we’ve never loved before.

If we treat each other with respect
and more often wear a smile,
remembering that this special dash
might only last a little while.

So, when your eulogy is being read,
with your life’s actions to rehash…
would you be proud of the things they say
about how you spent YOUR dash?